Photo: Travel Baker County

Southern & Central Elkhorns

In the Southern and Central Elkhorns you’ll find fun switchbacks, high mountain lakes, and plenty of mountain goats.

The trail networks in the Southern and Central region of the Elkhorns are reminiscent of their mining history. Most routes and trails in this area of the elkhorns are old mining routes or somehow parallel old routes. Numerous mine ruins and old infrastructure (telegraph/power lines) dot the landscape as well. Many trailheads in this area of the elkhorns require a high-clearance vehicle for access.

The closest towns are Sumpter, Granite, Unity, Herford and Baker City. The nearest hospital and medical services are 1-2 hrs away, in Baker City. 

Anthony Lakes operates in partnership with the Wallowa-Whitman National Forest under a special use permit, and is an equal opportunity provider.

  • Summit Lake Trailhead Click to learn more about trailhead amenities, trails, and current conditions.

    Trailhead Amenities

    Vault Toilet
    Cell Service
    Water
    Garbage

    Driving Directions

    Directions to Summit Lake Trailhead

    1. From Baker City, Oregon head north on Highway 30 toward Haines for approximately 10 miles;
    2. In Haines turn left and follow the Anthony Lake Highway signs for approximately 11 miles to Foothill Road;
    3. Turn left on Foothill Road and go south for approximately 3.5 miles to Bulger Flat Lane (County Road 566);
    4. Turn right on Bulger Flat Lane and head west and south west on an unnamed road for approximately 4 miles to the Forest Service (FS) boundary;
    5. At the FS boundary the road becomes FS road 7301; Follow FS road 7301 for approximately 5 miles to the trailhead.

    The last 5 miles of Forest Service 7301 road past the Forest Service boundary are recommended for high clearance vehicles only.

    Summit Lake Trail #1635

    Trail Description

    Trail description coming soon.

    Current Conditions

    Clear of snow, winter debris may exist.

    Trip Types

    Biking, Hiking, Horse Riding, Camping

    Map

    View Conditions

    Reported Trail Conditions

    Summit Lake Trail #1635

    • Summit Lake Trail was cleared by two volunteers on July 17th, 2021. It is now clear from the Elkhorn Crest down to the North Powder River.

    North Powder River Trail #1632

    Trail Description

    The North Powder River Trail, which is actually an old wagon road, provides access to the headwaters of the river, the Elkhorn Crest Trail and the Lost Lake Trail. The first mile contours up along the northwest slope above the river, beneath large trees and across open sagebrush and grass-covered slopes. The upper half of this portion passes a boulder-filled stream bed. Beyond the Lost Lake Trail junction (1621) the road improves somewhat continuing up toward the crest. The trail crosses a number of seasonally wet meadows and spruce/fir-covered benches with wide-ranging views of the entire river drainage. Campsites are plentiful in these upper benches and meadows.

    Current Conditions

    Clear of snow, winter debris may exist.

    Trip Types

    Snowmobiling, Hiking, Mountain biking, Horseback Riding, ATV/OHV

    Map

  • Killamacue Trailhead Click to learn more about trailhead amenities, trails, and current conditions.

    Trailhead Amenities

    Vault Toilet
    Cell Service
    Water
    Garbage

    Driving Directions

    Directions to Killamacue Trailhead

    1. From Baker City, Oregon, take U.S. Highway 30 to Haines, turn west on 4th Street.
    2. After 1 ½ miles, turn left on Rock Creek Road and follow it to the right (west).
    3. Stay on Rock Creek Road; it turns into Forest Road 5520 at the National Forest Boundary.
    4. Drive to the trailhead (21 miles from Baker City and approximately four miles from where the pavement ends).
    5. The trail begins 100 yards up an old road immediately before Killamacue Creek. There is limited parking at the trailhead.

    The last 1.5 miles of the road are recommended for high clearance vehicles only.

    Killamacue Creek Trail #1617

    Trail Description

    Trail #1617 follows Killamacue Creek in a steady steep climb to the lake basin, tucked at 7,137 feet in elevation, between Red Mountain and Chloride Ridge. A prominent peak on Chloride Ridge is visible from various openings through the thick spruce and fir canopy along the trail. Occasionally, small meadows appear along the creek, with a large meadow lying in the basin just below the lake. There are good camping spots on the benches surrounding the lake.

    Current Conditions

    Clear of snow, winter debris may exist.

    Trip Types

    Hiking, Mountain Biking, Horseback Riding

    Map

  • Rock Creek Lake Trailhead Click to learn more about trailhead amenities, trails, and current conditions.

    Trailhead Amenities

    Vault Toilet
    Cell Service
    Water
    Garbage

    Driving Directions

    Directions to Rock Creek Lake Trailhead

    1. From Baker City, Oregon, travel north on Highway 30 for about 10 miles to Haines, Oregon;
    2. In Haines turn left (west) on Anthony Lakes Highway towards ski area for 1.7 miles to Pocahontas Road;
    3. Turn left on Pocahontas Road and go 0.2 miles to South Rock Creek Road;
    4. Turn right on South Rock Creek Road and go about 5 miles to the Forest Boundary (near end of pavement);
    5. South Rock Creek Road turns into Forest Road 5520 at the Forest Boundary so continue on Forest Road 5520 for about 2.7 miles to Eilerson Meadows;
    6. Continue on Forest Road 5520 at right road fork before Eilerson Meadows and go about 1.5 miles to Forest Road 250;
    7. Turn left off Forest Road 5520 onto Forest Road 250 and go 0.1 miles to trailhead.

    Advisory: Forest Road 5520 is a narrow, rough gravel and dirt road suitable for high clearance four wheel drive vehicles. Forest Road 250 going into the trailhead is an out-sloped, narrow road with limited turn-around and no trailer turn-arounds.

    Rock Creek Lake Trail #1626

    Trail Description

    The steep and strenuous trail (#1626) provides an especially varied and scenic route to the heart of the Elkhorn range climbing through a forested slope in the first two miles and then skirting the eastern edge of Rock Creek basin. Two large meadows interspersed with spruce/fir bogs fill this basin, providing ample campsite areas. Views of the basin and the West Fork Rock Creek drainage are displayed from the upper section of the trail. A smaller, seasonally wet meadow marks the approach to Rock Creek Lake. The lake lies in a talus basin beneath Rock Creek Butte (9,105′) and Spirit Rock. Snow pockets remain year-round on the southeast side of the lake.

    Current Conditions

    Clear of snow, winter debris may exist.

    Trip Types

    Hiking, Mountain Biking, Horseback Ridin

    Map

  • Marble Pass Trailhead Click to learn more about trailhead amenities, trails, and current conditions.

    Trailhead Amenities

    Vault Toilet
    Cell Service
    Water
    Garbage

    Driving Directions

    Directions to Marble Pass Trailhead

    1. From Baker City, Oregon north on Highway 30 to northern edge of town to Pocahontas Road;
    2. Turn left (west) on Pocahontas Road and go about 7 miles to the Marble Creek Road (becomes Forest Road 6510);
    3. Turn left on Marble Creek Road and go for 9 miles to the top of the ridge to the trailhead.

    Advisory: Forest Road 6510 is very rough, steep and narrow. High clearance four wheel drive vehicles are strongly recommended.

    The Elkhorn Crest Trail #1611

    Trail Description

    The Marble Pass Trailhead is located on the southern end of the Elkhorn Crest National Recreation Trail. The Elkhorn Crest Trail is the highest trail in the Blue Mountains and runs along the Elkhorn Mountain ridgeline across sub-alpine forests and grasslands. From the northern to southern terminus it runs for 28 miles and offers panoramic views of the Baker Valley, the distant Wallowa Mountains and the Blue Mountains. Along the way you can also view six high mountain lakes, craggy nearby peaks and maybe catch a glimpse of a herd of elk or resident mountain goats.

    Current Conditions

    Clear of snow, winter debris may exist.

    Trip Types

    Hiking, Backpacking, Horse Riding. Mountain Biking and OHV Riding are allowed up to the wilderness boundary (2 miles from northern terminus and 14 miles from southern terminus).

    Map

  • Twin Lakes Trailhead Click to learn more about trailhead amenities, trails, and current conditions.

    Trailhead Amenities

    Vault Toilet
    Cell Service
    Water
    Garbage

    Driving Directions

    Directions to Twin Lakes Trailhead

    1. From Baker City, Oregon travel south on Highway 7 (also known as the Elkhorn Scenic Byway) towards John Day, Oregon for about 22 miles to the Deer Creek Road;
    2. Turn right on the Deer Creek Road (County Road 656) this will turn into Forest Road 6550 and go about 3.5 miles to Forest Road 6530;
    3. Turn right on Forest Road 6530 and go 0.6 miles to Forest Road 030; Turn left on Forest Road 030 and go 2.5 miles to the trailhead entrance sign.

    Visitors can park at the lower area near the entrance sign or the upper area about 0.5 miles up the steep road.

    Twin Lakes Trail #1663

    Trail Description

    The trail to Twin Lakes follows Lake Creek up the drainage climbing fairly steep through an open forest with scattered old growth spruce and Douglas-fir trees in the first portion. It crosses the creek once, about 1/2 mile from the trailhead. At approximately 2 miles up the trail, the junction with the old trail to Marble Pass to the south is still visible. From that point the trail traverses an open hillside meadow resplendent with wildflowers in the summer. Mountain goats are often seen in their haunts on the ridge west of the Twin Lakes basin. A large flat meadow just above the eastern shore of the lakes provides an ample camping area and grazing for horses; other camping areas exist between the two lakes.

    Current Conditions

    Clear of snow, winter debris may exist.

    Trip Types

    Hiking, Backpacking, Horse Riding. Mountain Biking and OHV Riding are allowed up to the wilderness boundary

    Map

While you're recreating in this region, please consider fueling up and winding down at our local food and drink establishments. This will not just enhance your vacation, but contribute directly to the great community that is taking care of these trails.

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